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Poetry Breakfast

Beginning March 20th, 2016 Poetry Breakfast will once again serve a little poetic nourishment every morning. Start your day with our new expanded menu. Poems, of course, are our specialty. But we will also be serving a fuller menu that includes poetry related creative non-fiction such as letters to and from poets, essays on poetry, and anything else that might feed a poet and poetry lover’s soul.

Mise En Place – A Poem by Candice M. Kelsey

Mise En Place

A married couple sit on the porch
and hear someone knocking
at the door. It is quite loud.

The wife says Maybe we should answer
the door. It is getting louder.

Their sons are sitting in a dorm room
and also hear someone knocking
at the door. It is slow and heavy.

The older brother says We should take care
of that constant knocking at our door.
It has become unbearable.

Years go by.

The younger brother knows the knocking
at the door is what destroyed their family. He asks

Has anyone asked our sister if she’d like to come inside?

After a few decades of listening to the knocking
at the door, the brothers become too busy to notice it.

The parents become hard of hearing.

 

 

About the Poet:
Candice M. Kelsey is a passionate educator who has been working with teenagers for 18 years. She earned her master’s degree in literature from Loyola Marymount. Primarily a poet, she has been published in Poet Lore, The Cortland Review, Hobart Pulp, Burningword, Wilderness House, Leveler, and more. Candice is also the author of a book exploring social media’s impact on adolescent identity. She lives in Los Angeles where she carves out a life with her four children and nine pets; she enjoys listening to opera any chance she gets!

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Alexa, What Is One Plus One? – A Poem by Marina Sofia

Alexa, What Is One Plus One?

‘I think you know the answer to that one.’

Because I would not, could not stay calm
or reasonable with fact-based evidence
Because instead of all the answers
I had questions of my own
Because I stamped my feet at injustice
and cried noisily at films
(quietly into my pillow at night)
Because he asks questions he already knows the answer to
just to test and tease and lecture on
till touch has gone, unless it’s right swipe.
Because who wouldn’t rather be a hammer than a nail?

He bought Alexa as a Christmas present for himself.

 

 

About the Poet:
Marina Sofia is a global nomad, reviewer and writer, who’s recently moved back to the UK after spending several years in the French Alps. She has published in online and print journals, and thinks poetry is the best procrastination when she should be working on her crime novel. She also spends far too much time blogging at http://findingtimetowrite.wordpress.com/ and tweeting @MarinaSofia8.

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Sparrows – A Poem by Gerry Stewart

Sparrows

Open, white page yawning out morning.
My notebook sidesteps any focus.

I’ve forgotten the raw taste of captured ink,
I’ve lost where the words reside
on my lips, against my eyelids.

Our black cat gazes at his watery reflection,
a palimpsest in the kitchen’s murmur.

Forgotten how to acknowledge the whirlwind
that shook poems out of me
like beating a carpet after a long winter.

Your sink laughter splashes bubbles,
you know I’m wasting time.
My poem jumps from dishes to table,
scooping up crumbs.

I’ve forgotten to give it time,
how to connect pen to paper,
to disconnect from technology.

You offer to buy me a bird book
to name our invited guests.
I begin our poem with:
Once all small birds were sparrows.

Forgotten the sound of thudding lines,
the surety of a bold hand scratching them out.

 

 

About the Poet:
Gerry Stewart is a poet, creative writing tutor and editor living in Finland. Her collection Post-Holiday Blues was published by Flambard Press, UK. Her writing blog is http://thistlewren.blogspot.fi/

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Three Women – A Poem by Mark J. Mitchell

Three Women

++++++++++++ For Phoebe
++++++++ 1.

Sylvia who taught me—
early—words were knives—
She showed me
how brittle they became
when she sharpened my
tender ear.
Whispering to me:
Vowels float like balloons.

++++++++ 2.

Denise said: Taste!
And she meant it.
She spun words
into tough and delicate webs
woven of razored sugar.
When you kiss them
too taut
her labyrinth
won’t let you see.
She left one last command:
Taste God. Now.

++++++++ 3.

And Elizabeth
dropped her words,
hard, artful, strict
as diamond breadcrumbs.
They formed paths
down structured mountains
to a perfect beach where
they perfect the mechanics
++++++++++++ of shape-shifting.

 

 

About the Poet:
Mark J. Mitchell studied writing at UC Santa Cruz under Raymond Carver, George Hitchcock and Barbara Hull. His work has appeared in various periodicals over the last thirty five years, as well as the anthologies Good Poems, American Places, Hunger Enough, Retail Woes and Line Drives. It has also been nominated for both Pushcart Prizes and The Best of the Net. He is the author of two full-length collections, Lent 1999 (Leaf Garden Press) and Soren Kierkegaard Witnesses an Execution (Local Gems) as well as two chapbooks, Three Visitors (Negative Capability Press) and Artifacts and Relics, (Folded Word). His novel, Knight Prisoner, is available from Vagabondage Press and another novel is forthcoming: The Magic War (Loose Leaves). He lives in San Francisco with his wife, the documentarian and filmmaker Joan Juster where he makes a living showing people pretty things in his city.

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

from the porch swing – A Poem by Claretta Holsey

from the porch swing

from the porch swing, I see
people pumping past
their limits,
cars swinging like pendulum
to the extremity of
what I see as road,
sun slinging light this way
into the dry street,
clouds swinging shade away
from the fawning trees.
to and from, I swing
because I heard that breeze
could tame. the rhythms
dizzy. I can’t get up from
here. the rhythms
hold, ball and chain
and ray,
wood and steel
until.

 

 

About the Poet:
Claretta Holsey is a student at Stetson University, class of 2019. She is currently a sophomore, majoring in English and minoring in Creative Writing and French. Though she pursues these studies in Florida, her home will always be Georgia. Her work is influenced by the timbres of jazz and Pentecostal psalms.

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Carpenter Sunrise – A Poem by Joe Cottonwood

Carpenter Sunrise

From my window I see
branches dripping
gray fog.
I face a long day
heaving heavy boards,
testing
my brittle back,
glasses wet
with sweat,
porcupine fingers
bristling splinters,
shaping lumber
with a clear heart.
+++++++ Carpenter, carpenter, what do you say?
+++++++ Cut wood all day,
+++++++ bring home the pay:
+++++++ a pocketful of sawdust.
With strange joy
I can’t wait
to begin.

 

 

About the Poet:
Joe Cottonwood has worked as a carpenter, plumber, and electrician for most of his life. Nights, he writes. His most recent book is 99 Jobs: Blood, Sweat, and Houses.
joecottonwood.com

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

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