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Poetry Breakfast

Beginning March 20th, 2016 Poetry Breakfast will once again serve a little poetic nourishment every morning. Start your day with our new expanded menu. Poems, of course, are our specialty. But we will also be serving a fuller menu that includes poetry related creative non-fiction such as letters to and from poets, essays on poetry, and anything else that might feed a poet and poetry lover’s soul.

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national poetry month

Poet Dreaming – A Poem by Loretta Diane Walker

Poet Dreaming

No sky could hold so much light.
—Mary Oliver

Poems are nomads paddling through darkness
collecting words from the arms
of Orion, Sagittarius, and Perseus
before camping in a poet’s dream.
She sees souls as colliding galaxies,
holes of light burning
with millions to trillions of stars
too bright to fit in the cavity of sky.

Those stars are poems
crammed in the dusty envelopes of mortal bodies,
shimmering beneath white ribbons of bone.
A silhouette of stars floats in the window of her eye.
The energy of need forces tiny hands to brush
against the small wings of a sigh hovering in the evening.

She hears the silhouette speak
in a voice the timbre of a piccolo,
“Look Mommy! I caught a butterfly.”
On the other side of her dream, she sees the light of joy,
and a moth beating its powdery gray life
in the basket of a child’s palms.

 

 

From “In This House” published by Bluelight Press.

 

 

About the Poet:
Loretta Diane Walker won the 2016 Phyllis Wheatley Book Award for poetry, for her collection, In This House. She is a five time Pushcart nominee. She has published three collections of poetry. Her manuscript Word Ghetto won the 2011 Bluelight Press Book Award. She teaches music in Odessa, Texas.  Loretta received a BME from Texas Tech University and earned a MA from The University of Texas of the Permian Basin.

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

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Poet Census – A Poem by Loretta Diane Walker

Poet Census

Numbered like centuries of chipped stars,
we stood, waited to be counted, categorized,
divided like sheep and goats
by poetry’s crooked staff.

Angelou, Atwood, Oliver were lined
behind Browning, Dickinson, Rossetti,
their mouths fat with words,
tongues thick with gossip.

I leaned closer to hear. They spoke simply
of beauty, love, and how the corners of death
fold us into ourselves and sometimes
it is the wings of poems that lift us back to life.

 

 

From Word Ghetto published by Bluelight Press.

 

 

About the Poet:
Loretta Diane Walker won the 2016 Phyllis Wheatley Book Award for poetry, for her collection, In This House. She is a five time Pushcart nominee. She has published three collections of poetry. Her manuscript Word Ghetto won the 2011 Bluelight Press Book Award. She teaches music in Odessa, Texas.  Loretta received a BME from Texas Tech University and earned a MA from The University of Texas of the Permian Basin.

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

The Neighbors – A Poem by Rae Desmond Jones

The Neighbors

Are so quiet – they rarely appear –
The washing is there but
We never see them

There are times
When I walk out early
& the street is empty
When an old car with faded paint
Backs out of the drive
Onto the road

But the driver & passenger
Always have their faces turned
& their only child looks straight
Ahead & does not blink

From day 5 of the Nation Poetry Month 30 in 30 Challenge.

 

About the Poet:
Rae Desmond Jones is the son & Grandson of miners. He is now retired & lives in Sydney where he writes lots of poetry. He has published six books of poetry & novels. He will have another volume of poems (L GHAZALS) out soon.

 

Photo from Unsplash.

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Table – A Poem by Rae Desmond Jones

Table

Who do you groan
When I lean on you
With my arms?

You were so strong
When you were a tree
Bending & weaving
In terrible winds

While gripping the
Earth with deep root
Fingers

From day 3 of the National Poetry Month’s 30 in 30 Challenge.

 

About the Poet:
Rae Desmond Jones is the son & Grandson of miners. He is now retired & lives in Sydney where he writes lots of poetry. He has published six books of poetry & novels. He will have another volume of poems (L GHAZALS) out soon.

 

Photo from Unsplash.

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Poetry Prompts 30 in 30 A Poem A Day

Poetry Potluck and Inspiration Buffet

April is National Poetry Month. We know many of you are trying to write a poem a day this month. So for our Inspiration Buffet we’re giving you a poetry prompt for every day.

You’re welcome to post your poems in the comments. Or, you can submit your poetry for consideration in our daily menu (we publish a new poem every morning). If you’d like to submit your work, visit our Submission Guidelines.

Poetry Prompts:

April 1:
Write a poem about the home you were born in. What would that house, building, room say?

April 2:
Write a poem about learning a new word for the first time. It could be a word you recently learned, one you learned long ago, or even one you taught to someone.

April 3:
Write a poem where you have a conversation with an inanimate object. Talk to it. And if you’d like, let it talk back to you.

April 4:
Write a poem about a dream you had recently. Dreams are a wonderful brewing ground for poetry.

April 5:
Write a poem about your neighbors.

April 6:
Write a poem from the perspective of yourself when you were a little kid.

April 7:
Write a poem sparked by your experience of waiting in line.

April 8:
Write a poem about the first thing you do in the morning.

April 9:
Write a poem about something you don’t understand, something that doesn’t make sense to you.

April 10:
Write a poem about not wanting to write a poem.

April 11:
Write a poem about the part of your physical appearance that you least like. And love it.

April 12:
Write a poem about fixing your bed.

April 13:
Write a poem about a power outage, about having no electricity.

April 14:
Write a poem about shopping for a gift for someone.

April 15:
Write a poem about having dinner out alone.

April 16:
Write a poem about getting lost while trying to get somewhere.

April 17:
Write a positive poem about someone you recently insulted or criticized. Find what is poetically beautiful about them and write about it.

April 18:
Write a poem about what you think is the worst part of your personality.

April 19:
Write a poem about visiting someone at the hospital.

April 20:
Write a poem an heirloom you have from someone who had died.

April 21:
Write a poem about something you recently wanted to say but didn’t say.

April 22:
Write a poem about your first car. If you never had a car, your first bike, bus ride, train ride…something that allowed you to travel on your own.

April 23:
Write a poem about something you stole.

April 24:
Write a poem about how people would see you if they didn’t see what you posted online and only knew you face to face.

April 25:
Write a poem about something you are not able to do but wish you could do.

April 26:
Write a poem about washing something.

April 27:
Write a poem about not knowing where someone you once knew is now and wondering where they are.

April 28:
Write a poem about laughter.

April 29:
Write a poem the home of someone you know who is no longer alive.

April 30:
Write a poem promising yourself something.

 

Photo by Alexandre Vanier.

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