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Poetry Breakfast

Beginning March 20th, 2016 Poetry Breakfast will once again serve a little poetic nourishment every morning. Start your day with our new expanded menu. Poems, of course, are our specialty. But we will also be serving a fuller menu that includes poetry related creative non-fiction such as letters to and from poets, essays on poetry, and anything else that might feed a poet and poetry lover’s soul.

Category

Poets

Toukokuu – A Poem by Gerry Stewart

Toukokuu
(Finnish for May – sowing moon)

This gamble –
a seed thrown down
on warming soil.
Surrender the weight of hope
into the season’s fickle hands.

Each cycle I am found hollow,
ringing beneath the wide sky.

Chittering greedy birds
begging the question
of when to draw a line.
To leave the field fallow,
allow weeds and rain
to run rampant.
Replenish the earth
or abandon all enterprise.

At day’s opening notes,
I walk the furrow,
press earth into the soles of my feet,
until it accepts my weight.
My hand lifts to the clouds
hiding the divine from my sight.

The grain spins free.

 

 

About the Poet:
Gerry Stewart is a poet, creative writing tutor and editor living in Finland. Her collection Post-Holiday Blues was published by Flambard Press, UK. Her writing blog is http://thistlewren.blogspot.fi/

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

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Fairy Tale – A Poem by Karen Bingham Pape

Fairy Tale

If Rumpelstiltskin
appeared from straw
and demanded my first born
he would have to take
the poem that went
south one winter day
when my love told me
it didn’t make sense:
there’s sense
and nonsense I’d say,
staring the little man down:
I would win
having learned
the hard way
not to go giving
pieces of myself
to every gnome
who comes along
pointing his finger
stamping his feet

 

 

About the Poet:
Karen Bingham Pape is a teacher and writer. Her poems have appeared in small press publications such as Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review and Maverick Press and in on-line journals such as Big River Review, Red River Review, Words-Myth, bluepepper, The Artistic Muse: Pohemians, and Perigee. She has read her work at conferences such as Southwestern ACA/PCA Pop Culture, ASU Annual Writers Conferences in Honor of Elmer Kelton, and Fort Concho Literary Festival.

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Sunday Morning – A Poem by Carole Stone

Sunday Morning

I bring the New York Times
in its blue plastic bag
from the end of my driveway.
I hunt obituaries,
an article about New Jersey,
then move on to places I’ve never been —
Thailand, China, Japan, all of Africa,
images of palaces, jungles,
bombed out cities.
Today news of my own country
comes first, and my granddaughter calls
her mother weeping,
we won’t have a woman president
and how can she deal with the man
who’s been chosen?
Last night I dreamed the new President
stalked me.
Night before, Russian mobsters,
guns in their holsters, wolfed down blini,
gulped vodka, sat by my bed.
I put aside my newspaper.
“The day is like wide water, without sound.”

 

 

About the Poet:
Distinguished Professor of English and creative writing, emerita, Montclair State University, Carole Stone’s most recent poetry collection is LATE, Turning Point, 2016. HURT, THE SHADOW, Dos Madres Press, was published in 2013, and AMERICAN RHAPSODY in 2012. Her recent poems have been published in Slab, Exit 13, Cavewall, Adanna and Bellevue Literary Review. She divides her time between Springs, East Hampton and Verona, New Jersey.

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Shelter from Fallout – A Poem by Barbara Saxton

Shelter from Fallout

Perhaps it was all in my head.
After dinner (Persian eggplant dish
I took hours preparing), no hug,
no goodbye, not even Thank you
at the door.

You just up and left. Did you have too much
to carry, or maybe a headache?
More likely, your mind was on George,
waiting outside in silence, his car motor
already running.

On my way down the hall
to the bathroom, I banged the right wall
with my fist, first by accident, then again,
with more of a wind-up.

When these conflicts arise
between longtime friends, what hope
can we have for our nation,
the planet, a universe?

Apology calls the next morning
may not happen at all,
or come in far too late.

 

 

About the Poet:
Barbara Saxton has worked as a translator, financial consultant, and educator. She is now a retired English teacher, singer, dancer, relentless outdoor enthusiast, and published poet (Dual Exposure – 2015 – and various literary journals/anthologies).

She lives in Mountain View, California, with her husband Owen and a cat named Kolo. Their two adult sons reside in San Jose and San Francisco.

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Gathering Grandma – A poem by Lylanne Musselman

Gathering Grandma

A child of the Great Depression,
grandma became an adult
who stocked up on paper towels,
toilet paper, coffee, sugar, and
flour by the pound, even
those braided multi-colored area rugs.

Her upstairs bedrooms,
once occupied by her two children,
became overrun with piles of
those items – on the beds, under
the beds, on dressers, in dresser
drawers and mounds scattered
all around the hardwood floors.

Never missing a sale, she couldn’t
have used all she hoarded
if she lived 100 years.
We used to tease her
about her cluttered upstairs collection,

us grandchildren, at her house, taught
to use toilet paper sparingly,
unless in public bathrooms, where we always
were to cover up those unsanitary seats,
to ration paper towel squares to dry
our grabby hands, to re-use
small Dixie Cups, our initials
marked on the bottoms,
until they were pulp.

 

 

About the Poet:
Lylanne Musselman is an award winning poet, playwright, and artist, living in Indianapolis, IN. Her work has appeared in Pank, Flying Island, Poetry Breakfast, The New Verse News, Ekphrastic Review, and Rat’s Ass Review, among others, and many anthologies.  In addition, Musselman has twice been a Pushcart Nominee. She is the author of three chapbooks, with a fourth forthcoming, Weathering Under the Cat, from Finishing Line Press. She also co-authored Company of Women: New and Selected Poems (Chatter House Press, 2013).

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Mise En Place – A Poem by Candice M. Kelsey

Mise En Place

A married couple sit on the porch
and hear someone knocking
at the door. It is quite loud.

The wife says Maybe we should answer
the door. It is getting louder.

Their sons are sitting in a dorm room
and also hear someone knocking
at the door. It is slow and heavy.

The older brother says We should take care
of that constant knocking at our door.
It has become unbearable.

Years go by.

The younger brother knows the knocking
at the door is what destroyed their family. He asks

Has anyone asked our sister if she’d like to come inside?

After a few decades of listening to the knocking
at the door, the brothers become too busy to notice it.

The parents become hard of hearing.

 

 

About the Poet:
Candice M. Kelsey is a passionate educator who has been working with teenagers for 18 years. She earned her master’s degree in literature from Loyola Marymount. Primarily a poet, she has been published in Poet Lore, The Cortland Review, Hobart Pulp, Burningword, Wilderness House, Leveler, and more. Candice is also the author of a book exploring social media’s impact on adolescent identity. She lives in Los Angeles where she carves out a life with her four children and nine pets; she enjoys listening to opera any chance she gets!

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

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