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Poetry Breakfast

Serving a little poetic nourishment every morning. Start your day with our new expanded menu. Poems, of course, are our specialty. But we will also be serving a fuller menu that includes poetry book reviews to feed poets' and poetry lovers' souls.

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Literary Journal

Caught – A Poem by Nynke Salverda Passi

Caught
by Nynke Salverda Passi

A moth’s tetrapterous body is impaled—
++++++as if by the pins of its eyes—

on the green screen door of my kitchen.
++++++The powdered edges of its wings

pulsate with the calm of death
++++++upon the faint extinction of its breath.

It is early fall, the air paper-thin
++++++as if it could tear. I can’t tell apart

the squares of mesh from the moth’s
++++++nacreous skin. My mind tries

to capture this scene in luminous words
++++++and turn this ordinary door

that needs a coat of paint and a new knob
++++++into relic or shrine.

Then the barest flutter of pensive,
++++++passive rage trembles through the moth’s

caviling frame. It dies so young, so
++++++surely, and it has no name.

Now I’m awake it dies, and as I slept
++++++last night, its life had just begun.

 

 

About the Poet:
Nynke Salverda Passi was born and raised in the Netherlands. Her work has been published in CALYX, Gulf Coast, Red River Review, Illya’s Honey, and The Anthology of New England Writers, among other places. Her poetry has been anthologized in Carrying the Branch (Glass Lyre Press) and River of Earth and Sky (Blue Light Press). Together with Rustin Larson and Christine Schrum, she edited the poetry anthology Leaves by Night, Flowers by Day. Her story “The Kiss” was nominated for a Pushcart, and her essay “Oom Ealse and the Swan” was one of the finalists in the 2014 Editor’s Prize of The Missouri Review. Nynke has 20 years of college teaching experience in creative writing and is director of The Soul Ajar, a writing center offering workshops and collaborations exploring the relationship between writing, creativity, and healing.

Find her website here: https://www.nynkepassi.com/

Bells Palsy – A Poem by Ingrid Bruck

Bells Palsy
by Ingrid Bruck

To smile is natural until you can’t. It happens fast as a hummingbird. Nerves on one side of the face stop working. Can’t lift the left eye brow. Can’t wink the left eye. You use a finger to open or shut the eyelid. Wear a black patch over that eye to protect it. Can’t drink from a glass. To hold in a straw, you pinch your lips around it. Face and mouth sags, food and drink dribbles. People startle on meeting. You feel like a freak. Understand the Phantom of the Opera wearing a mask, want to join him in the cellar. If you could catch the thief who stole your whistle, you’d spit in his face but can’t. The not bad news is that nerves heal – you recover with gratitude at your good luck.

 

 

About the Poet:
Ingrid Bruck grows wildflowers, makes jam and writes short form poetry and haiku. She’s a retired library director living in the Amish country of Pennsylvania in the US, spends time with grandchildren and writes very day. Her first chapbook, Finding Stella Maris, was released by Flutter Press this past winter. Current works appears in Between These Shores Literary and Arts Annual, Halcyon Days, The Song Is… and Nature writing. Poetry website: www.ingridbruck.com

A Thank You to June’s Supporters of Poetry Breakfast and Other News

A special thank you goes out to the following patrons for helping support and fund Poetry Breakfast:

  • Judith Carroll
  • Rose Amato

Poetry Breakfast is now ad free which means our web costs have significantly increased. Since the beginning of Poetry Breakfast, the editor and found, Ann Kestner, has covered all costs associated with running the journal.

You can help offset those costs by becoming a Poetry Breakfast Patron at https://www.patreon.com/PoetryBreakfast

It’s simple. Basically, you voluntarily “subscribe” to Poetry Breakfast. These voluntary subscriptions start at just $2 a month.

Poetry Breakfast does NOT charge reading fees and is FREE  to read. So, there is no source of revenue other than the kindness of Poetry Breakfast Patrons.

Find out more about being a Poetry Breakfast Patron at https://www.patreon.com/PoetryBreakfast

IN OTHER NEWS:

1.
A comment section will appear under all poems published from here out. The hope is that poets will have a chance to see how their poems are being received via actual words and not just number of likes.

Plus, it will give readers a way to reach out and let poets know how much they like a poem.

2.
We have five new poems coming this week from: Faye Nunez, Max Reif, Mark J. Mitchell, Ingrid Bruck, and Gabriel Muoio.

That’s all for now. Here’s wishing everyone has a wonderful week.

Best Wishes,
Ann Kestner, Editor

Learning Signs – A Poem by Sneha Madhavan-Reese

Learning Signs

Her signs grew from imitation,
and then the thrill of being understood.
She formed signs with pudgy hands
before she learned to hold a spoon.
She points out dogs and bikes
on our morning walks
with a pat of her thigh
and a pedaling of fists;
at night, she rubs pointer fingers
together towards stars in the sky.
Her words came quickly, but still we sign:
through windows, behind others’ backs,
sometimes when there is no reason
not to talk. We face each other
to speak with the whole of our selves,
our meaning plain to see.

Note:  This poem can be found in Observing the Moon – A Collection of Poems by Sneha Madhavan-Reese, published by Hagios Press.

About the Poet:
Sneha Madhavan-Reese lives with her family in Ottawa, Ontario. Her poems have appeared in numerous literary journals and anthologies, including Global Poetry Anthology 2015 and The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2016. Observing the Moon is her first book. www.madhavan-reese.com/sneha

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

It’s Existential – A Poem by JPDiBlasi

 It’s Existential

In my dream
someone I don’t recognize
is reading my mind
one word at a time.

Or perhaps they’re writing,
in cursive, composing
my dream,
not reading at all.

I can’t tell.

I don’t recognize the hand
but the touch feels familiar.
Could be my own,
or maybe even yours.

I feel the touch each letter makes,
the curl of the C,
the carve of the X,
the scribble of the looping capital M.

Am I living the dream
or is the dream living me?
It doesn’t matter.
Pass the popcorn.

 

 

About the Poet:
JPDiBlasi is a native New Yorker and currently lives and writes in the Hudson River town of Ossining where she is completing her first collection of poetry. A new writer, her poems have been published in Chronogram, Pilcrow & Dagger and Little Lantern Press. She is an independent grant writer for not-for-profit agencies seeking funding for children’s mental health programs. Friends love her sense of humor.

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

Next Time – A Poem by Sneha Madhavan-Reese

Next Time

Sometimes I tell my father about a city
he should visit, and — its being far,
his being almost ninety — he says, “Okay,
next time.” Meaning, in his next life,
a new set of chances for catching up,
finishing off, and making right.

My mother reads only religious books, but does
not aim for eternity in this life. “I have to
be born so many times,” she says. “No need
for me to meditate just now.”

My impulse is to find their faults —

my heart is like the bitter gourd
in my parents’ garden — though there is nothing
I wouldn’t do for them. Each day I try
to live a deliberate life, knowing my chances are many
but numbered, knowing that someday someone will judge me,

and hoping it will not be too harshly.

 

Note:  This poem can be found in Observing the Moon – A Collection of Poems by Sneha Madhavan-Reese, published by Hagios Press.

 

 

About the Poet:
Sneha Madhavan-Reese lives with her family in Ottawa, Ontario. Her poems have appeared in numerous literary journals and anthologies, including Global Poetry Anthology 2015 and The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2016. Observing the Moon is her first book. www.madhavan-reese.com/sneha

 

 

Poetry Breakfast accepts submissions of poetry and poetry related creative non-fiction year-round.  See our Submission Guidelines page for details on submitting your work.

 

Start your morning with a nourishing poem.  Follow us on  Twitter, Facebook, and  Tumblr,  and enjoy a new poem every morning straight to your feed.

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